sessions

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2016
Gregg Pollack
Team Craftsmanship: 20 Principles to Put People First

Over the last year as the Code School team has grown to over 50 people I’ve learned a lot as a leader.  I’ve begun to understand what it truly means to put people first in business, and how to craft effective teams.  In this talk I’ll tell some stories and give 20 principles which anyone can apply in their own team to improve.

Session - Big Picture
2016
Karl Sakas
Don't Just 'Make the Logo Bigger': Creating Great Client Relationships

Working with clients (external or internal) can be tough. What if every client appreciated your expertise? What if working with them was fun, not hard? It's possible, if you have the right tools! Based on 19 years of learning things the hard way, we'll work together to find and practice solutions. You'll laugh, you'll cry... and you'll feel more confident about working with your clients and stakeholders.

Session - Biz
2016
Emily Stamey
Pulling up Your Legacy App by its Bootstraps!

Your mission, should you choose to accept it, is to support an application built on an older framework. Upgrading isn't an option. The code is untested and nowhere near best practices or standards. In this session we'll talk about strategies to incorporate modern PHP coding practices to add features and functionality and retiring the older code in pieces. We'll review specific examples and code from a real project where we bootstrapped an early CodeIgniter app.

Session - Dev
2016
Scott D. Epter
Customer Patterns: Successful strategies for working with different types of customers

There’s an old adage:  “Customers don’t care what you know until they know that you care.” This talk will share methods for maintaining customer relationships as a company grows.  A smaller tech company can easily devote large amounts of time and energy to each customer, naturally fostering individual relationships.  As the company grows (and customers multiply!) it’s difficult if not impossible to provide that same individual attention at scale.  Yet it is no less important for each customer to believe that you *care*.  We’ve managed this change by looking across our customers and defining a set of customer types or “patterns”.  By pattern behavior early (even with prospects before they become customers) we are able to adapt our approach to each customer, keep them delighted and not kill ourselves in the process.

Session - Biz
2016
Marion Newlevant
Programming in Twig

One way to get a handle on Twig is to think of it as a programming language, one with a consistent and predictable syntax, rather than a random collection of incantations. I start with the basics: syntax, data types, control structures, and get fairly quickly into the depths: macros, extends, includes. You'll come away with a better understanding of how to use Twig more effectively in your project work.

Session - Dev
2016
Brett Burwell
The Benefits of Embracing Design (and How Doing so is Easier Than You Think)

There’s been a vocal call for designers to familiarize themselves with code for a while now. What’s been missing is a corresponding push for developers to learn more about the language and nuance of design.

As developers, we enjoy working with designers who understand the possibilities, limitations, and potential pain points of their designs. In a similar way, designers appreciate a developer who cares as much about the visual side of their code as they do about making it efficient, organized, and maintainable.

In this talk I’ll explore why developing design sensitivity is easier than you might think. I’ll also cover how doing so can improve the quality of the projects you work on, the strength of your professional partnerships, and ultimately, the success of your business / career path.

Session - Biz